Leave These 10 Drywall Jobs to the Pros

Drywall may be something that seems relatively straightforward and easy to work with.  And, while this is true to some degree, it does not mean that it is a project that anyone should attempt to DIY.  When drywall is done improperly it is very obvious.  Further, proper drywall installation requires certain tools and knowledge that not everyone possesses.  One would have to go to the store and buy a whole new set of tools and instruments to install drywall and take time out of their busy schedule to learn techniques and safety.  Installing drywall is more than just putting drywall up and calling it a day.  You must know how to do things like cut, mud, and tape.  And, not just know how to do it but do it correctly so that things like seams don’t begin to show over time. Speaking of safety, there is always a risk of injury any time you take on a home DIY project and drywall is no exception.  Safety Management Group elaborates on how easy it is to injure yourself when doing drywall work, “Studies by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health have concluded that injuries caused by overexertion and falls are the two primary hazards facing workers who handle drywall, accounting for more than two-thirds of injuries. Overexertion and muscle strains result most often from carrying, lifting, or holding drywall, with back injuries a common result…A typical sheet of drywall weighs between 55 and 120 pounds, depending upon size and composition. Lifting while bending or twisting creates more stress on the back, increasing the potential for injuries, while holding elevated drywall in place can strain arm, neck, and shoulder muscles.”  Professional drywall installers know how to safely and correctly install drywall, using safety gear and the correct tools, to ensure the end result look excellent.  Below are 10 drywall jobs that are best left to professional, trained, drywall installers.

Leave These 10 Drywall Jobs to the Pros

  1. Restoring discolored and damaged areas
  2. Framing to install a patch or replacement
  3. Patching holes in ceilings or walls
  4. Repairing tape seams and nail pops
  5. Installation of new drywall
  6. Tape, mud and float seams
  7. Prime before texturing to hide seams
  8. Texture to match existing surface: flat, knock-down, popcorn and orange peel
  9. Removing wall paper
  10. Priming and painting drywall
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